MIXIS LIVING

Unity through Diversity

Mixis Living Question of the Day

MIXIS QUESTION OF THE DAY:

Mixis, I've had several conversations with people in various groups who are all for marriage equality are champion the Lovings and other couples in history who broke the barriers when marrying someone of another color was illegal in the USA - there were even biblical reasons/justifications why people of different colors, races, etc should not marry and yet we all celebrate this amazing court ruling. Two cases will go before the Supreme Court regarding the legality of same-sex marriage in the United States, one today March 26 and the other tomorrow, March 27. It breaks my heart when I hear these same people that fought for civil right and people that supported these civil rights spewing hate, fire and brimstone against the same thing we all fought for! Isn't this hypocritical? Why is there such a double standard? Where does your group stand on this issue?

-RK, Chicago

MIXIS QUESTION OF THE DAY:

My beautiful biracial (blk/wht) daughter has self image issues. She always complain about how dark she is and she absolutely hates her natural beautiful curly hair and had all but destroyed it with every straightening and bleaching potion ever made. I just don't know what to do - she seems to have issues making black friends and goes out of her way to disassociate herself from any thing afro related. I don't understand - I have two other children who are well adjusted and get along fine with everyone and are happy with their looks and heritage. I'm not sure what to do, her dad says it's a phase but truthfully the phase has been going on since she was 4 and she is now 16. I am really concerned, why can't she find happiness in being mixed? Why does she so desperately want to be white?

-Dumbfounded Mom, Tampa, FL

MIXIS QUESTION OF THE DAY:

If you or kids are multiracial, how do you racially identify yourself, and why? I am black and white mix and I love my parents equally but I look and identify more with black people. My family is ok with it. Many of my mixed friends don't seem to like the fact that I say I'm black! It's not about one drop anything it's how I look and culturally relate. Why do I have to hear nonsense about how I'm subscribing to the onedrop rule. I thought we could identify how we choose. My mom even told me I was black! Hello!? Also nobody ever heard about One drop outside of the States!

-Double chocolate Oreo

MIXIS QUESTION OF THE DAY:

Hey Mixis, how come when people describe their mixed background, they never say white? It’s always French, Irish, Norwegian, Russian, blaw blaw blaw. I didn't know they fell into the "race" category. Cracks me up. i don’t have a problem with that at all. i just have a problem with people who go out of their way to pretend their "white" background doesn't exist. Whatever that means.

-James Southard, Nashville TN

MIXIS QUESTION OF THE DAY:

CAME ACROSS THIS QUESTION ON THE INTERNET AND WONDERED HOW THE MIXIS FRIENDS WOULD RESPOND? -- "I am sick to be labeled a bigot or a hater simply because I express my racial pride. All over the world you see Asian pride, Black pride, American Indian Pride, Jew pride, mixed race pride, But how about White pride, why is White pride viewed in a negative manner by the non Whites? The only place I can express my pride is in my membership with the Aryan Nations & White Pride World Wide web sites." -- MY OTHER QUESTION IS, IS THERE MIXED RACE PRIDE?

-David

MIXIS QUESTION OF THE DAY:

"My cousin has blond hair, blue eyes and white skin but Latina face. What should I consider her? White or Hispanic? It's like Obama who is half white half black and everyone consider him black..."

-Liz

MIXIS QUESTION OF THE DAY:

"I am white and I have a 10 year old biracial son. The thing is my son is all me he looks white, he does have curly hair but the texture of mine. The problem is he has never met his dad, because we broke up before he was born. I moved to another state before he was born, and his dad never pursed us. Recently his dad and I have reconnected, and he wants to meet his son. My son knows his stepdad is not his biological dad, but he does not know his dad is black. I thought it would be best since my husband is white, and I didn't think his dad would ever surface again. The only dad my son has ever known is white, how do I introduce him to a black man as his dad now?"

-Torn

MIXIS QUESTION OF THE DAY:

I am white my boyfriend is black, I'd like to choose a name for our baby that will fit both of our races. You know instead of having a "white" name like Elizabeth, Jane, Samuel and Jason, or a "black" name like Kobe, Keisha, Kadijah and Latisha, I'd like a name that sounds like it could be of both black or white origins. Any Ideas? Boy or girl, not sure of the sex yet."

-Joy

MIXIS QUESTION OF THE DAY:

"My girlfriend is white and I am black. We have a mixed race son that looks really white and even has blond hair. When he was born my mother tried to convince me to have a DNA test to find out if he was really mind because he didn’t look anything like me. I love my mother but, that really hurt me. Should I ask my girlfriend if we could get a DNA test to appease my mother?"

-Matt

MIXIS QUESTION OF THE DAY:

'WHAT IS REVERSE RACISM? ISN'T RACISM, RACISM PERIOD?

MIXIS QUESTION OF THE DAY:

"On both sides of my family my great grandparents were a mix of scotish, Welsh and African. So I consider myself a multi-generational mixis. I think that all light skin black people are multi-generational mixis. Can anyone tell me the difference between a light skin black person and someone who is mixed race?"

-Anne

MIXIS QUESTION OF THE DAY:

"My boyfriend and I are both biracial and we have dated a rainbow of people. A couple of days ago he asked me how many sexual partners I've had. I don't believe that's something I should go into detail with someone I am dating. I am curious if the people on this page agree or disagree. Is that something that should be known -- or, if your partner wants to know, should you discuss it?"

-D.D.

MIXIS QUESTION OF THE DAY:

I am 20 and was in an interracial relationship. I recently found out that I am pregnant. , but I am no longer with the father of my child. By the time I told him, he told me he is already in a relationship with someone else. Because I am pregnant I wanted to try and have a relationship with him, but now I'm not sure, even though I think it would be better for my child to have both parents. Should I try and get him back?

-Heather

MIXIS QUESTION OF THE DAY:

Does anyone knows where the saying 'Once you go black you never go back' originate?

MIXIS QUESTION OF THE DAY:

WITHOUT USING THE TERM RACE, SINCE WE ARE ONE RACE. HOW DO YOU DEFINE MIXED? WHAT MAKES YOU MIXED?

MIXIS QUESTION OF THE DAY:

"Hello, i was hoping you could give a little advice. My girlfriend is married and doesn’t know if she is ever going to leave her husband. She tells me she doesn’t do anything with him. She sees me multiple times a day she tells me she loves me. We do everything together i have met her family she has met mine. She doesn’t disrespect me when it comes to a relationship she chooses me over him all the time. I love her unconditionally... I am a white male she is a black female so this situation is hard all the way around because we get looks from every angle…can you just give me some advice because i believe she is my soul mate and i don't want to give her up..."

-AL

MIXIS QUESTION OF THE DAY:

"The thing about being biracial is that you can hardly even relate to other biracial people. Some of us are constantly explaining or defending our “race” to others; some struggle to create their own identity. My question is do you relate to other biracial people that are not the same racial mix? If not why not?

MIXIS QUESTION OF THE DAY:

“Usually when I think of a mixed-race child (black/white) I think of a tan, curly-haired baby. I have dark-brown skin and profound features, and the father of my daughter is Irish. She came out with blonde hair, blue eyes, and very pale skin. She looks just like her father. It's hard to understand. I don't want be looked at as a nanny walking down the street with my daughter. Has this ever happened to anyone else?”

-Dian